Rick’s Emergent Award and Things to come…

This morning the winner of the Quartz Museum’s inaugural Emergent Practitioner in Clay Award was announced by our Prime Minister, in her role as Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage, in a gracious short speech. Jacinda looked as delighted as I feel sure that the winner of the $10,000 must be. His name is Oliver Morse, he’s from Wellington and the winning work is entitled House of Dee and here are images of its front and back, I am unsure which is which and it really doesn’t matter, but it seems, from its presentation, to distinctly have front and back. It’s a tad hard to tell but I assume the pot is round. Jacinda displayed it with the large aperture to the front so maybe she understood how it should be.winner #2_MG_6279 medium res-1 (2).jpg

The Award was judged by the Trustees for the Rick Rudd Foundation, Collector Tom Seaman and artists Paul Rayner and Rick Rudd. No technical details are given but its size can be judged by watching Jacinda hold it and it’s somewhere about 30cm high maybe a bit more. Go to…  https://youtu.be/uch  It looks hand built of terracotta clay with a white slip as background for the hand scribed and painted figurative surface illustrations. More importantly, the judges’ statement mentions that “the work could only have been made in the 21st Century….” And that’s dead right. Much of the new work seen in international sites is either loosely handbuilt and artfully, extravagantly textured with vibrant colour that takes it past the natural base often cited as source. Drips and blobs, lumpen and fissured, slumped and perforated surfaces and all in glorious technicolour. The other principal avenue is the figurative – modelled or drawn and painted, in toto or simply parts. Works present narratives or play with organised religion, sexuality or gender; they are often sourced in the feminine or the domestic but further viewing can reveal something deeper and darker. Always however, the hand-built, and often loosely so, is paramount and demonstrable skill often eschewed – even if often there.

Go to some of the online sites for art or ceramics and find their lists of the ‘new artists in clay’ and these two genres will be much in evidence. Or open any one of about five or six new print publications on the ‘new expression in ceramics’ and there are many, many more. And with few repeats of names. So this really is quite a movement happening. Possibly the strongest for a very long time.

Oliver Morse’s exhibit taps into this figurative genre. According to the press release, he has a history in painting and theatre and the work is autobiographical. That’s hard to see from the images but we’ll look forward to seeing more from this artist who has been but two years in this interesting avenue, one with a long history, from ancient Egyptians, Persians and Greeks to the Peruvian Moche and Mexican Aztecs to Majolica and Delft of European origins. It’s the stuff by which cultures and civilisations are known.  Morse’s painting is charmingly loose as it floats around the vessel, which the judges stated, “… is simply canvas…the drawing confident, lively and sketchy, in keeping with the vessel itself.” As can be observed from the other side, he has not left the interior unembellished either. There is a dark figure, horned, painted inside. Is “Dee’s house” where the devil lurks one wonders? There is no artist’s statement to offer some clues but the lightly clothed figures around the outside surface might suggest some contemporary bacchanale? A wild night in Wellington?

Speculation aside, the Trust intends to offer this Award triannually and focus particularly upon early career artists. The criteria, about the word ‘emergent’, which apparently confused some of the 65 entrants this year, will be clarified then. There are some 37 works selected by the judges that will be on exhibition at Quartz until March next year. This includes Morse’s winning work so you can see what moved the judging committee. Meanwhile he has a most useful $10,000 to invest in his work and career. We’ll look forward to seeing what his win brings to his oeuvre in the future.

winner #1_MG_6297 medium res-1 (2).jpg

Images, courtesy Quartz Museum, by Richard Wooton.

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  1. Alix Ashworth

    I am glad that someone won this that might be able to bring something new to the vessel and blend a modern illustratory look at decoration with a traditional style of making. He is using the vessel as his canvas in a way that shows depth and narrative. I look forward to seeing some sculpural work from him.

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