John Chalke

Just heard also that our 20th Fletcher judge, John Chalke, English – born Canadian has also died today. John was born in Gloucestershire in 1940, went to Bath Academy in 1962 for his Art Teachers Certificate and subsequently had a studio in London and taught at Farnham and Harrow before emigrating to Canada in 1968. While he continued to teach, off and on, full-time and part, throughout his career, his real focus was always his studio work. Over years as experimenter, maker and artist he took part in more than 240 major national and international exhibitions. As much alchemist as potter his glazes were famously and identifiably his and his alone. Crusted and volcanic, fissured and crackled, gloopy or glittery, neon green or persimmon orange he used a wild variety of ingredients no one else had dreamed of adding to a glaze and that he enhanced by putting them through numerous repeat firings. Usually averagely sized, for he held no interest in dramatic scale, they mostly alluded to platters but variously deep or with partial edges and most often they sat quietly on a wall awaiting the close scrutiny that they inevitably attracted.

‘The real reason for making art, I think, is because it didn’t work out, and then you go back to square one or square three or some square….’

He loved the firing process and built numerous kilns including a three-chamber wood number out on the prairie in the southwest Alberta foothills and where he kept a small cabin. His joy was to head away there and work alone for days on end as the need took him. Several times he recounted to me about spiritual episodes he encountered while there and believed there was more to our existence than what we meet in daily reality but was uncertain quite what that might be. He also had a sly humour and a profound respect for nature. He brought with him to NZ a wooden branch about the thickness and length of a sizeable forearm sharpened at each end to a point. I was not allowed to have it until I guessed what caused the form. Eventually I got that it was shaped by a beaver and he loved recounting how they worked collectively and how persistent they were that if a dam was breached and destroyed, they waited until all was quiet then just returned to the job starting all over again to construct a haven for their pups. I have it still.

John came to New Zealand in 1996 as our 20th Fletcher Challenge Ceramic Award judge where he chose Japan’s Yasuko Sakurai for the Premier Award. He was a philosophical and considered judge, highly observant and appreciative of a wide number of making principles. But it was Sakurai’s smoky figures that caught his attention most for they reminded him of some of those prairie encounters. He followed up his visit here with being judge for the Sidney Myer Awards in Australia and he was the first recipient of Canada’s top accolade, the prestigious Governor General’s Award for Fine Craft. There were many other awards over the years and his work is in major collections internationally including the Victoria and Albert in London.

As well as a spiritual side John was a naturally gifted writer and this applied to the titles he bestowed upon his work as well as how he engaged with trying to answer questions about his making and ideas. For example one title was,

The First Horses Came Late, But Slipped Into The Province Like Ghosts on a Wet Day.

And one statement reads…

“It’s still hard to know how my pre-making mind operates. I know it sometimes calls upon quarries of ideas, which are based on known previous historical and cultural contacts … early American and English slipware, French wood-fired country pots, Japanese Oribe designs, woodcuts from early children’s books. But then there is another pulse which sporadically appears above the thought horizon, like northern lights. It might be the peeling red and blue paint on a barn door … or a folk art weathervane … perhaps the word “Clinchfield” on a boxcar across the tracks…. What the objects I make must have to operate successfully is a comfortable relationship with the human scale: for example, an engaging encounter with both hands. But they should maintain a querulous position also, like dug up jewelry or a table top in the rain.”

Canada will mourn and our sympathy and thoughts go to his wife, Barbara, who visited here with him.

Those wishing to send a personal message to his family can do so here:

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addendum

Don Reitz Vase in the Auckland Museum Collection (System ID: 12996 Other ID: K3658)

vase, Don Reitz, USA stoneware height 640 x diameter 275 mm

vase, Don Reitz, USA
stoneware
height 640 x diameter 275 mm

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Don Reitz

DonWithJarsDon Reitz died a few days ago. He came to New Zealand first as guest of our major event, the 1981 NZSP Symposium in Palmerston North Training College Campus and it was to be our first big-scale American style (so we thought) gathering with multiple events happening at once – talks over here, demos over there, informal kiln-building up there… and the only place everyone gathered was the Exhibition Opening. Except for one….

Reitz was here at the urging of Neil Grant who had been to the USA and come across him somehow. I had signed up for some terribly worthy thing on smoke emissions or something but the lecture start was delayed and, never one for hanging around, I wandered across to the big lecture room opposite to fill in the time for a bit. I never left.

The hall was packed and the only place possible was standing and then sitting on the exit stairs. The joint rocked. Up on the stage Reitz was demonstrating by wedging 25kgs of clay at a time and throwing and building and then adding to, his large-scale baroque handled and lidded vessels at the same time as he was talking and dispensing his down-home philosophies tinged with mysticism, telling his anecdotes and being candid about his life’s journey from a dyslexic, difficult school time to almost becoming a butcher after a deep sea diving stint in the Middle East. As a lumberjack in Canada he spent time with an elderly Native American from whom he understood one of his great lessons – that you have a choice and if you are not doing what you want to do, you don’t want it badly enough. He took himself to art school and there discovered clay. He loved clay – ‘you’re working with decomposed dinosaurs, and trees, and maybe a few human cultures in there. It’s a recording device, you know? It records every force you put on it – it records personalities, civilisations and cultures’.

Reitz was a born crowd-pleaser and the audience, which included most of the other off-shore guests too, hung on every word. And the words were good and resonated with everyone in some way or another. He referred to the fact that he tied his lids down because the space inside was his ‘private space’ and, ‘ do whatever blows your skirts up’ to the unforgettable, ‘A potter is always a day late, a dollar short and a show behind’ which entered the local vernacular at lightning speed. He was a man of warmth and humility and he was open and showed it with great generosity. The crowd responded and the roar at the conclusion of his demonstration was proof. We had never seen the like.

His second visit was as our 1964 Fletcher Brownbuilt judge when he gave the Premier Award to Merilyn Wiseman. Her salted, slip-trailed platter resonated with him because, as he said, the trailed decoration has been allowed to touch the edge of the dish. This, in Native American understanding ‘allows the spirit to escape’. It was his mystical side that caused his decision to land there, as we have seen with other judges. In the end there is some personal echo and response that makes the final outcome. Again he held the audience in the central room at the Auckland Museum in the palm of his hand as he spoke.

I remember his warmth and interest in everything as he sat on my deck, high in the Waitakeres, enjoying a beer with the small group of potters who had brought him. He was keen to learn if any changes had been made since his 1981 visit when he had been appalled at the prices charged for studio pottery and urged us then to challenge galleries about what they did  for their commission. ‘Sooner or later you realise there are only so many pots in you so while you’re producing you should at least get a minimum wage.’  ‘Humanism is in demand. People want something that is human. What they buy is you.’ Reitz was responsible for the Baroque handles and similar extravagances added to pots following his visit. We watched as he had such fun adding, what seemed at the time, these outrageous addenda to his generously proportioned pots and saw the contrast they provided for the severely simple, no-nonsense handles we had learned from the Leach era and loved the sheer indulgence of it – all that allowable playing with marvellous clay. Vestiges remain still.

Don Reitz was Professor of Art at Wisconsin University for much of his career and after retirement he, like many others, moved to the warmth of Arizona where he continued making pots for many years. He is survived by his wife, Paula Rice, and his children and grand-children and will be mourned by the entire US clay community and many from outside that. He was 85.

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(very long) Notes From The Big Apple

The Big Apple

The Big Apple

 

Weather forecasts are accurate; absolutely spot-on most times. Comes from a Continental climate rather than our more unpredictable marine variety.

The ‘town that never sleeps’, is not just a handy song line; it really doesn’t.

Not only do they drive on the wrong side of the road but light switches turn off and on the wrong way and it takes more than a month to get used to it. But they are sensibly installed at upper thigh height instead of our almost shoulder height. This saves getting tired through unnecessarily raising the arms to illuminate a room.

Great sign in a shop…   ’ Unsupervised kids will be treated to a double espresso and a free kitten’.

Saddest sign in a shop… ‘January special – half price puppies’.

50cm of snow looks great, at least from a high window. The sprinkled rock salt melts it swiftly from footpaths. Challenges arise when that melt re-freezes causing a thin layer of ice hidden under the fresh new fall. Step on one of the lurking frozen dog turds that roll beneath the shoe and it’s like ball bearings…

They get out and enjoy it though. Dressed suitably, (the Michelin-man look predominates) they stroll Central Park, take the kids for toboggan runs there and even go for the $50 horse carriage rides and the $3-a-minute pedicab rides. Neither did the snow decrease the queue of folk waiting their turn to lay flowers or get a photo at the John Lennon Memorial ‘IMAGINE’ in Strawberry Fields. Some very acrobatic fans even managed ‘selfies’ while bereft young women  still quietly sobbed away despite their not even being born when he died.

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Central Park on a sunny day

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Central Park on a sunny day

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Central Park on a sunny day

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Central Park on a sunny day

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Central Park on a sunny day

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Central Park on a sunny day

Wasn’t aware that snow came in such variety. This must depend on the temperature as it falls I guess. A heavy fall in New York arrived via extremely cold, still air. The snow was fluffy, crisply surfaced,  thick and soft and lasted many days in that pristine state. When I stumbled in an unseen drain and fell flat on my face I was totally cushioned, not wet, and unhurt. Another heavy fall came down in temperatures barely below freezing so this dump was way wetter, slushy, sloppy and soon very slippery. With a temperature drop it turned to ice with a high gloss finish. Dangerous stuff that lined the sides of every footpath (sorry – sidewalk). Some salt however colours it an evil neon blue, so you know.  Sometimes the piled up slushy sloppy stuff goes brown with crud and mud. With a new fall on top of its re-frozen  lumpen profile it’s like vanilla frosting on milk chocolate ice cream or a winter landscape through a car window. It’s all been an interesting novelty for we from more temperate climes.

The subways have been an experience too. New York was really the simplest. One $2.25 ticket and go where you want and stay down there as long as you want changing stations or lines as you want. A ten minute or a three hour ride costs the same so no penalty for those who live in the outer reaches of Queens or the Bronx. No penalty for those who live down in the subways either….ride all night and sleep in the warmth. Philadelphia’s subway was newer and cleaner, a touch more complex to buy a ticket from the machine while Washington’s was space-age designs, stations that looked like they were part of the movie set for ‘Brazil’, (you get a shot occasionally on TV3’s ‘House of Cards’) with single escalator rides to the surface rising several stories in one go and a complicated system of ticket purchase that required help every time as you needed advance knowledge unavailable to a casual tourist.

The art experience was hugely varied but mostly excellent to wonderful. Two art fairs in Manhattan were interesting. One was the Annual New York Ceramics Fair with exhibitors from England as well as the USA. The stalls carried American antique pieces from Jugtown grotesque face jugs to salted stoneware by 18thC German immigrants through to mid-century Russell Wright carnival ware.. The British stalls offered superb examples of Staffordshire ware… Whieldon, agate, Crown Derby, Doulton, all with hefty price tags and I blog on this separately.

The other Fair was more general, The New York Art Fair showed the contemporary on some stalls and folk art on others. The folk art was amazing in range with articulating wooden and tin toys of the turn-the-handle sort, made by slaves, Quilts made by the Amish and splendidly framed embroidery samplers that were reminiscent of scenes from Gone with the Wind made by young ladies from The Deep South. There was photography, both vintage and contemporary and yes, some ceramics, archaic and contemporary which was mainly from off-shore – Spain and Scandinavia. These dealers know where interesting work is happening and they go and get it.

But the archaic pieces were museum quality…

 Maranon Culture – Equador, terra-cotta. 300 BC. $40,000

Maranon Culture – Equador, terra-cotta. 300 BC. $40,000

Seated Woman – Chinesco Culture – Mexico 300 BC. $75,000

Seated Woman – Chinesco Culture – Mexico 300 BC. $75,000

Early in the visit, we walked the Chelsea Gallery circuit one Saturday, along with many others. Up and down 23rd to 29th street under the Highline and in and out dozens of galleries. We were pretty tired at the end of the day having visited dozens and dozens of galleries at street level, only to discover later that many of those huge old warehouses had as many as a further six or seven floors all equally crowded with art establishments offering yet more. It’s impossible to see all and we tried to concentrate on those with photography, applied arts or artists of particular interest for us but even there, it’s overload.

Other than art fairs, many of the cluster of galleries in the Chelsea and Upper East side of Mahattan had ceramics on offer as part of their mix. Barry Friedman has been the most prominent since Garth Clark closed but he too is closing his 26th street establishment but is reputed to be re-opening, in part of the same several storied premises in a new manifestation later this year. The red corduroy suited, fez wearing Friedman has represented many of the top names in ceramics and other applied arts media, principally glass, for many years including Libensky/Bryctova and Toots Zynski,  Also Akio Takamori,  Tip Toland, Sergei Isupov, David Regan… figurative artists in ceramics .

PPOW also carries some interesting ceramists, Judy Fox in particular. I saw a show by Jessica Stoller and at the opening most of the NYC art ceramicati were there including Betty Woodman, Judy Schwartz and Steve Montgomery. The work was over-the-top feminist with a twist.  It initially seemed a satire about how women are portrayed, and there is nothing new in that, but Stoller used ceramics and what proved a formidable battery of skills to push the concept. She is another US artist who has revived old commercial techniques. The centrepiece was a table load of surreal, vanitas, excess that only became clearer with a second guess. Someone described it as ‘a grotesque cornucopia of crassness’ and that was pretty apt as what at first looked a bit like a little girl’s tea party rapidly took on repulsive undertones with ribbons of lacy pale pink and mauve porcelain like elaborate mounds of frosting piled up around a grinning skull, bowls full of ripe fruit featured detached legs and hands as handle ornamentationbeside dishes of breasts splayed like scoops of melting ice cream, the chocolate dripping from strawberries becomes sinister once the snail on the other side is seen and the fingernails on protruding hands, take on a menacing mien all by themselves. It was erotically enticing and then you see it has gone horribly awry and all is in an excessive mien over-the-top into decay and dissolution. The sexually aggressive bent contrasted with the precious daintiness of the medium and its elaboration with pastel china paints and lustres. It was more than satire; it was stretching the concept to breaking point. I felt quite ill.

Jessica Stoller’s groaning table

Jessica Stoller’s groaning table

Jessica Stoller’s groaning table

Jessica Stoller’s groaning table

Jessica Stoller’s groaning table

Jessica Stoller’s groaning table

The only place that minimalism governed was out of NYC in Beacon, an hour or so by train to the Dia Art Foundation galleries, in an enormous former factory that celebrated minimalism – sometimes so minimal the work almost disappeared in those vast spaces. There in room after room many large scale works whispered a little at a time. There Richard Serra really ruled with a suite of immense pieces that overwhelmed in scale (massive), surface (gorgeously rich yet subtle) and colour (opulent iron red/brown). Such a relief after an unremitting diet of off-white almost everything surrounded by acres of ‘air’.

The Le Witts were great...

The Le Witts were great…

The Le Witts were great...

The Le Witts were great…

The Le Witts were great...

The Le Witts were great…

The Le Witts were great...

The Le Witts were great…

Le Witt - light

Le Witt – light

Lost in the Serra’s

Lost in the Serra’s

Lost in the Serra’s

Lost in the Serra’s

Lost in the Serra’s

Lost in the Serra’s

Lost in the Serra’s

Lost in the Serra’s

Lost in the Serra’s

Lost in the Serra’s

Best was the trip up and back. The train ran, after leaving the Bronx, alongside the Hudson River the whole way. Initially the surround was industrial/domestic but soon that was overtaken by long stretches of very lovely countryside; bare trees and frosty grasses, grand sweeps and intimate corners. Charming small commuter towns occasionally appeared, the houses two and often three storied and no fences between as seems pretty usual in that part of the USA. Folk don’t seem to be concerned about marking their exact parcel of land. The river itself was at first dark gray but after a mile or two some lumps of floating ice appeared. These gradually increased in number and scale and became paler until they were floating sheets and large floes the size of refrigerators which became ever more substantial until, in the end, it was  frozen over – this wide sweeping river became a fairly solidified avenue of shades of white. It seemed impossible that the wide, dark, moving water viewed an hour and a half earlier could become this pale plane shot through with occasional dark blue cracks in the ice, shafting down into a depth beyond vision.  Wonderful.

Frozen River

Frozen River

Frozen River

Frozen River

Finally, Philips de Pury, the uptown, Park Avenue, New York sister to the London auction house held an auction of the collection of Betty Lee and Aaron Stern on 17th December. 160 works of applied arts, some glass, chairs, cabinets, a few odd things, but mainly ceramics. Vivika and Otto Natzler, Elizabeth Fritsch but mainly Ken Price, Lucie Rie and Hans Coper – more than 30 pieces from each. I saw the best Rie bowl I shall probably ever see there and the clusters of Copers was quite overwhelming although many were smaller than I always expected from the illustrations in books or on a screen which is how we, living here, generally become familiar with these iconic works.

There are a few Copers in NZ, including a couple of small composite pieces in private hands (I have not heard whether one survived that Christchurch earthquake or not) and the ASP-owned vessel held at Auckland Museum – not a composite but a single, modestly scaled vase with the characteristic surface treatment. There are a number of Rie’s as her tableware was imported back in 50s and was mainly marketed by what we’d today call boutique art shops (often owned European immigrants). Prices were high, for example a Castle bowl of the time is listed at 18/6 (Eighteen shillings and sixpence), in the same catalogue a Rie bowl is offered at 7gns (Seven pounds and seven shillings).  Some of that tableware is still around and occasionally appears at auction (for a tad more than seven guineas). There are also some one-off pieces made later, 60s on and these are often in the hands of potters who went, knocked on her door in Albion Place and bought a work. But in all of this country there are not the numbers collected by this couple who assembled their collection over some forty years, keeping it spread over several homes.

The Price works were mainly from Happy’s Curios, Club del Oro and Townscape series and sold modestly as the raunchy content of some of the nightclub illustrated pieces possibly made them difficult to display in this day and age and the fact that some groups were, quite correctly,  kept together but  making them very expensive purchases for a case-full. It was the prices realised for the Ries and Copers which produced the greatest buzz. It seemed everywhere visited for some days had an opinion and general consensus was that a number of well-endowed museums were filling gaps in collections and that they had much the same gaps. Most works sold. It was Coper’s composite/multi-part works that were most keenly sought. One Digswell work estimated at 15-20,000 reached 100,000 and a Thistle work expecting 25-35,000 gained 75,000. But it was two Hourglass pieces, estimated at 30-40,000 and 16-26,000 that caused most comment by reaching 191,000 and 149,000 respectively (they looked perfect together – hope they stayed together) and a 1950s large globular pot, that evidenced an early step on the road to his mature style and was estimated at 30-40,000, which reached 197,000 and raised eyebrows. It was mainly those late composite works that gained extraordinary prices. Most however were in the upper reaches of, and slightly over, top estimates and these were mainly in the range of $US16-30,000. These were record prices and they situate the one in Auckland Museum, which has been bestowed with some optimistic values, in a more realistic light.

Rie’s pieces were similar gaining remarkable prices for a couple of pieces such as 81,000 for a bowl estimated to bring between 20-30,000 and a flared bottle form brought similar for a similar estimate while a raised dot bottle form tripled its upper estimate at 60,000. Again most works sold at upper estimate and few were passed in. But what an event. Even New York kept it top of the topics for a day or two.

Sorry, I did not have my good camera and the light was too elegantly muted for cell-phone images to be any use. But the entire offering is in the catalogue which can be bought on-line or simply go to the auction house website.   www.phillipsauctions/NY050413

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The Old Church Pottery Sale

Now, when was the last time you were part of a sizeable crowd and kept outside a church hall (in the cold I might add) until the exact time to open the doors is reached? At 6pm the doors are opened and people surge in to view and buy the pottery inside. The stuff dreams are made of? A recall of the mid-1970s? Not a bit. The Art School at Old Church does this annually and has all beautifully organised from the folk who take the entry fee at the door to the methods employed to keep folk moving and pots being bought – for example, once picked up and decided upon, a piece rapidly leaves your hands (making room for the next piece) and has your name attached and is taken to a ‘holding pen’ to where – once ready to depart – you head, identify these are indeed your choices, pay the cost (any way you like can be catered), and meanwhile your purchases are being securely wrapped, by another small team, in thin sheets of donated sponge sheet and lavish 2724packing tape. This method allows the potters, who man their stands, free to talk with one and all, and the buying public to circulate unencumbered. There is donated champagne or fruit juice to drink, Toll-house cookies and small pottles of fruit, nuts and seeds to eat. It all works fabulously well.

The Old Church, in Demarest, New Jersey (about ½ to ¾ hour drive from Manhattan depending on time of day) is now an art school and this was their 39th annual fund-raiser. They appoint a curator who chooses the exhibitors from applications by professional potters based in the North-East USA states from Maine to Pennsylvania to North Carolina and between. This year the curator was Karen Karnes and she chose 27 exhibitors with Chris Gustin and herself as chief exhibitors – and they shared a stand at centre of one of the rooms.

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Karen Karnes sitting by her work. Smaller works recent (she looked very frail) while the large covered jar that was more typical, was apparently an older piece.

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Chris Gustin’s work foregrounded… large scale, fluid impressive and expensive.

There were 26 exhibitors, all makers of ‘domestic ware’ in our terms, all ‘potters’ in North American terms (as opposed to ‘ceramists’ or ‘ceramic artists’). Apart from Karnes and Gustin there were other names that might be known like Scott Goldberg who has twice been to New Zealand and Jack Troy who was in NZ back in the 70s. Also there was Bruce Dehnert, who taught in Otago for several years back in the early 90s and who returned last year as guest and Artist in Residence for Waikato Potters.

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Scott Goldberg talking with me.

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Scott’s stand.

But no matter whether known to us or not, all there were of a high standard. Much work was stoneware, some wood-fired, but there was also porcelain and a couple of stands of decorated terra-cotta, and one used a formula for a clay body that could work directly over flame or element as well as it functioned in an oven..  While individual styles were very different, (these are mature artists who have clearly been at it for a long time) what was consistent was that American trope of altering the thrown piece evidenced by the articulation and enhanced functionality. Thrown and altered work was everywhere and made the walking through the exhibits engaging while contemplating quite how extensive were some of the amendments. Americans do this pretty much as a matter of course and it’s this that makes their tableware distinctive. Did I buy any? Well, yes. There were some bowls and some mugs (always need more in my house) that simply should not be left behind despite the cost of FedXing them home!

General view

General view

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General view

The whole event was set up very well so that makers could interact with clients with the least possible interruption, work could be viewed, discussed, bought and processed for getting home with greatest efficiency and least pain and inconvenience. But there was no hard sell – emphasis was on giving the crowds of regulars and newbies like us an enjoyable evening. It all worked and was to be repeated over the next two days once exhibitors filled all those spaces on their shelves from the boxes of reserves they brought.

Other artists involved, who you may like to look up via their websites are as follows (Most have websites as selling from these sites is an important part of their economy) Richard Aerni, Charity Davis-Woodart, Ryan Greenheck, Steven Hill, Naomi Dalglish and Michael Hunt, Nick Joerling, Jody Johnstone, Simon Levin, Suze Lindsay, Robbie Lobell, Michael McCarthy, Jenny Mendes, Matthew Metz, Alison Palmer, Aysha Peltz, Mark Shapiro, Rob Sieminski, Stacy Snyder, Sam Taylor, Tara Wilson and Sheryl Zacharia. Not to mention Scott Goldberg, Bruce Dehnert, Jack Troy, Chris Gustin and Karen Karnes.

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New Ceramics Competition – Italy based

‘OPEN TO ART’

Short deadline to this competition for ceramic ‘art and design’ based in Milan. But if you have images of available work ready, it’s possible.

Prizes are two of 5000 Euro each, a working residency in Faenza and a design contract.(under 30)

DEADLINE IS JANUARY 6th in PDF format in first instance, BUT, not impossible as if you make sure your package‘s postmark is before 6th then they will accept even if it arrives much later.

There is an entry fee, payable by PayPal and the jury is, even for Italy, something of a cast of thousands with ten members…all drawn from Europe, except one from Japan, and consisting of artists, curators, gallerists and institution officers.

Website is http://opentoart.laceramicainitalia.com      click the Union Jack for version Ingelesi.

At back it seems to be a design studio/manufacturer looking for new artists/designs for production but hard to know. Anyone who enters and can share on the experience is welcome to write.  Following is the official info……

Applicants should send, in a sealed envelope, the printed and compiled pre-application form and a CD-Rom containing:

  • A dossier on the artist’s work [in jpg, gif or png format, at 72 dpi, together with the description of the work (Title; materials and technique, size in cm; price of the work in euro.)]
  • Curriculum Vitae, with the artist’s training and exhibitions (if applicable)
  • Copy of an identity document
  • Receipt of the payment of the application fee.

    Documents should be in pdf format.

    An application will be accepted if it is complete in all its parts, dated and signed, and dispatched  New deadline: 6 January 2014 (as proven by the postmark date) in a closed envelope, with postage costs paid by the applicant. The envelope can be delivered by post, express courier, or by hand, to the following address:
    Officine Saffi srl – I Concorso Internazionale Ceramica d’Arte Contemporanea e di Design – Via Aurelio Saffi, 7 – 20123 – Milano – ITALY

 

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post christmas post

Here is the British Crafts Council’s very cool and clever Christmas greeting.

Pottery and animation – who’d have thought it could be done?

Thanks to Vic Evans who forwarded it to me so it might be shared by all.

Go to….

 

http://www.craftscouncil.org.uk/global/christmas?utm_source=Crafts+Council+Newsletter&utm_campaign=3d9429da48-Christmas+film+e-bulletin&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_e95fcaf30a-3d9429da48-84392953

 

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